Do you remember the photo scavenger hunt we posted last June? We had so much fun scoping out odds and ends to feature, we thought we’d go another round. Like last time, see if you can guess the location of these pictures before clicking the link to reveal the zoomed-out photo.

READ MORE: Can You Identify These 10 Wheeling Architectural Details?

1.

Click here to reveal the answer.

Absure Tower vault deposit box

Absure Tower

Location: 1201 Main Street

Charles W. Bates, the same architect behind the Capitol Theatre designed this iconic downtown Wheeling structure. It opened in 1915 as the National Bank of West Virginia, which is why it retains the unique circular safety deposit doors. These style of doors can be seen on other buildings around town… bonus points if you can name them too.

2.

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St. Alphonsus stairs detail

St. Alphonsus

Location: 2111 Market Street

The wrought iron railing on the St. Alphonsus church has these unique medallion details that are befitting of one of the city’s oldest churches.

3.

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Padden Pharmacy head details

Padden Pharmacy

Location: 1414 Eoff Street

Look up! Behind the storefront of the former Padden Pharmacy on Eoff Street you’ll find the face of a howling man cast in terra cotta.

4.

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Marsh Wheeling Stogies sign

Marsh Stogies

Location: Main Street, right off of the I-70 exit ramp

A Wheeling classic. While no longer lit, the Marsh Wheeling Stogies sign has long graced the M. Marsh & Sons plant.

5.

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Fort Henry stone marker

Fort Henry Stone Marker

Location: The Plaza on Market alley, the stone faces Main Street

Been to The Plaza on Market lately? Maybe you’ve seen the stone marker commemorating the Last Battle of Fort Henry. Once hidden behind bushes, the stone was rediscovered during the recent improvements to the plaza.

6.

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American Legion – Post 89

American Legion Post 89

Location: 1040 Chapline Street

The eye-catching blue brick building is the American Legion Post 89. Founded in 1946 by a group of predominantly African American veterans returning home from World War II, it is now the last historically Black American Legion in the state.

7.

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Property line in front of Independence Hall

Independence Hall Property Line

Location: 1528 Market Street

Nestled in-between the bricks in front of the Francis Pierpont statue is a metal L defining where the Independence Hall property ends and the city of Wheeling begins.

8.

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Roger’s Fireproof Hotel ghost sign

Rogers Hotel

Location: 14th and Market Street

Fireproof? This designation spoke to the fear of large structure fires in the early 1900s. Unfortunately, fireproof hotels were not necessarily safer if they did not have adequate exit routes. Luckily the Rogers never experienced a major fire.

9.

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Lincoln School stone sign letters

Lincoln School

Location: 1000 Chapline Street

The Lincoln School first opened in 1866 and educated African American children in Wheeling until 1953. The school at 1000 Chapline street with its distinctive steps and sign was built in 1943.

10.

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Augustus Pollack monument

Augustus Pollack

Location: Heritage Port

Augustus Pollack’s progressive relationship with his employees and fair treatment of Unions inspired organized labor leaders to erect this monument after his death in 1906.

How did you do? If you want to explore even more areas of Wheeling, then check out Wheeling Heritage’s collection of self-guided tours and brochures. From historic buildings to public art, there’s plenty to discover throughout the Friendly City. 

• Kate Wietor is an AmeriCorps member currently serving with Wheeling Heritage researching and writing historical content for Weelunk. Kate has a BS in Anthropology from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. In her free time, you can find her lurking in antique stores, marveling at the resiliency of plants in the urban landscape, and enjoying the multitude of hand-painted signs around Wheeling.

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